Month: March 2014

How to choose a Moving Company?

How to choose a moving company?
The BBB had more than 8400 complaints about moving company in 2009.  the NY Times suggests that “Common complaints included final prices greater than original estimates, damaged or lost goods and, in the worst scenarios, movers who held belongings hostage until customers paid thousands of dollars.”
You don’t want to be one of these guys…. Careful preparation and research will help you ensure that your move will be successful.

what-not-to-pack
Choosing the right moving company

• Make sure the mover is registered with the Federal
• Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) by visiting http://www.protectyourmove.gov
• Check the complaint record of a mover at www.protectyourmove.gov
• Avoid movers that do not show U.S. DOT numbers and Motor Carrier (MC) numbers in their advertisements
• Check the company’s D.O.T status on the D.O.T website Don’t hire a company with unsatisfactory record
• Make sure you understand the type of liability you sign for. This is a common pitfall for consumers. Ask yourself if 60 cents per pound is enough coverage for all your household goods if the unexpected happens

Choose a reputable mover:
• After doing all that start your actual selection process by asking a written estimate from at least three reputable moving companies. The estimate should be based on an actual inspection of your household goods.
• Remember your priorities when hiring a mover – If you hire a mover based solely on the cheapest price, you may be sacrificing other things that are actually more important, such as getting your possessions moved and delivered on time. And remember, movers are required by law to deliver your goods for no more than ten percent above the price of a non binding estimate. This is known as the 110 percent rule.
• Read “Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move,” a booklet from the Federal government that your mover is required to give you if you are moving from one State to another. This booklet also has information you’ll need if your goods are lost or damaged during the move. Finally, check the mover’s complaint history with local consumer advocacy organizations, such as the Better Business Bureau. Don’t hire a company that has many resolved claims with the BBB.
• Ask for recommendations from neighbors, friends, and relatives regarding the mover. An experienced and satisfied customer is the best reference you can get for a moving company.
• Your estimate: Your estimator should provide you with a comprehensive estimate of the cost for your move. The estimate should include such factors as: labor charges, trucks, packing materials, travel time and valuation coverage/insurance.
When selecting a mover, be sure you understand:
1. The rates and charges that will apply.
2. The mover’s liability for your belongings.
3. How pickup and delivery will work.
4. What claims protection you have.
In our business, there are two types of estimates: a non-binding estimate which means your final price will be based on the actual amount of hours and materials used on the job; and a binding estimate which gives you a guaranteed price that won’t exceed the amount quoted

A non-binding estimate is beneficial if:
1. You are not exactly sure of all the items you are moving ahead of the move date.
2. Your move will involve an unusual amount of details, like moving of a lot of fine art or antiques that you don’t want to rush.
A binding estimate is preferable if:
1. You want to guarantee your budget.
2. You haven’t moved often, and you are not familiar with the moving process.
Whichever type of estimate you choose – and whatever mover you work with, here are some helpful advice to ensure yourself a good estimate/moving experience.

• Don’t be tempted by the lowest price! It is easy for a salesperson to provide a low estimate for the job on a non binding estimate. The client will have to pay the full price if the job takes longer. Don’t be fooled by this tactic and investigate the estimate to find out if it’s realistic. As they say, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is!
• Get at least three estimates. This will allow you to make a fair, objective comparison.
• Compare apples to apples. Break down the elements of each mover’s estimate and make a detailed, realistic comparison of the parts, as well as the whole.
• Expect estimates to fall with a reasonable range of each other. A good estimate should be no higher – or lower – than 10 percent of the final cost of the move.
• Get reliable recommendations. We strongly suggest that you check out potential movers through objective sources like the Better Business Bureau, your state’s Department of Transportation or the AMSA. A reputable moving company will be listed with all three of these agencies – and they will have no claims registered against them.
• Ask a friend. We also suggest that you talk to your friends and co-workers. Get their unbiased opinions of movers they have worked with. Learn from their experiences. No one wants to recommend a mover to a friend – and have the move go badly. At Moishe’s, we are proud to say that a very large percentage of our new customers come to us from satisfied, past customers.

Getting an estimate from U.Santini – Call us at 718-768-6778 and talk to Brian or Daniel. We will be happy to schedule a home visit and provide you with an written, accurate estimate of your move. Our relocation consultants will help you determine your needs – at no cost or obligation to you. And they will also assist you with any problems that arise before, during and after your move. You are not alone in this process. We are with you – every step of the way.

How to reduce stress during your move

U.Santini guide to stress free moving
Moving is a stressful event. According to the the third most stressful life event, Employee Relocation Council it is the third most stressful event following death and divorce.
Moving disrupts your life and normal routine, it generates feelings of uncertainty as you enter new environments, new jobs, new schools and new social circles. The following suggestions may help make the move less stressful – and save you from needing a bottle of aspirin on the big day.

 

No stress moving with U.Santini
Reduce stress by moving with
U.Santini Moving and storage. Brooklyn, NYCPrior to the mov

Prior to the move

  • Be prepared – Advance planning and organization will make your move go better and more smoothly . Prepare a “Moving kit” that holds all of the important information and documents related to your move in one, easily accessible location. Use a folder, notebook, a daily planner, or an online document set to to keep track of important phone numbers and documents. The folder can include names, addresses and menus of restaurants in your new neighborhood, referrals for new physicians, maps of your new city/town and phone numbers of property management companies, garages etc. just to name a few items that you might want to include in this folder.

•    Make lists – Make a schedule of appointments to turn on and off your electricity, gas, water, cable and other fundamentals for your home. Visit your local post office etc. Research your new community and locate the emergency services, restaurants, museums, movie theaters etc.
•    Label as much as possible – Label each box with its contents and the name of the corresponding room in your new place. Write directly on the box or prepare labels with the information and attach the labels to each box.
•    Let them know – Fill out the United States Postal Service change of address form six to eight weeks prior to your move to make sure you receive your mail when you relocate. The form can be found at www.usps.com/moversguide/welcome.htm. And make sure you let the IRS know, too. A change of address form (Form No. 8822) is available on their Web site (www.irs.gov).

On move-in day

•    Find ways to occupy your children – Have toys, games and coloring books other readily available to fill the children’s time while the movers are bringing items into the home. It might be wise to employ a baby sitter on both ends. A responsible baby sitter will keep your children occupied and stress free during this very long day.  You will be calmer knowing that your children are calma nd occupied.

•    Take care of your pets – If you have a pet, put he/she in an isolated room with food, water and bedding. Post a note reminding everybody to keep the door shut. Check up on the pet from time to time. If you keep tropical fish you will need to make some arrangements ahead of the move day for their safe transport.
•    When you get home – Unpacking can be stressful and chaotic. Try to be as organized as possible while unpacking. Always unpack the most essential things first. Such as, paper towels, trash bags, light bulbs etc. The easiest way to recognize these boxes is to mark them with a bright colored sticker or a special notation that makes them stand out from the rest. Unpack the bathroom and bedrooms first, and then move on to the kitchen and other living spaces. Keep a trash bag in every room, so packing materials can be discarded as you go.

•    Food and beverages – it is going to be hard for you to cook while unpacking. Order in from one of the restaurants you located before hand.

After move-in

•    Unclutter – Most times, people find that they did not throw enough of their old belonging before the move. If you feel that some of your belonging are not suitable for you new place, than throw them and start your new life clutter and stress free.
•    Get to know your neighbors – Time , effort and courage will help you integrate yourself into your new community.
•    Remember…it’s a gradual process, but your patience will be rewarded in the long run. Go for a drive, walk or bicycle ride to learn your way around and meet your new neighbors and see your new town.
•    Join in – Look for clubs that match your interests. Running, reading, sewing…there are unlimited possibilities of organizations that can help you meet people in your new community. Check the local library or grocery store bulletin boards for notices of meetings. Don’t forget that children’s sports leagues, churches, and other parts of your life in your old community will still be available in your new one.
•    Keep smiling – Make sure you have “me time” everyday. Take a moment for yourself to figure out what you need to feel better during this emotional time. And, try not to sweat the small stuff. Remember that it is OK to miss the way things were, but take time to appreciate the new things in your life. Staying positive and keeping an optimistic attitude will help you adjust to your new home more quickly. Continue reading “How to reduce stress during your move”

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